Manhattan

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  • Available from $3,495,000 – $14,500,000

40 Bond

40 Bond really is a piece of art! Hotelier and Studio 54 owner Ian Schrager and partner Abby Rosen engaged the 2001 Pritzker Prize winner, Swiss architects Herzog & de Meuron, to design this unique avant-garde building. Herzog & de Meuron far exceeded expectations through reinterpreting the traditional low-rise commercial loft buildings of SoHo by substituting dark-green glass for cast-iron, making the facade of 40 Bond one of the most interesting in all of NYC.

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40 Bond Street, New York, NY

  • Available from $n/a – $n/a

41 Bond

41 Bond has just launched sales (June of 2011), and the building’s expected completion date is by the Fall. 41 Bond is neighbors to 40 Bond and 25 Bond, two ultra luxurious buildings, so you can expect more of the same from their new neighbor, 41 Bond.

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41 Bond Street, New York, NY

  • Available from $8,000,000 – $22,500,000

350 West Broadway

Featuring six full-floor apartments and one penthouse, 250 Broadway is one of the most exclusive residences in New York’s trendy Soho. Designed by Moed De Armas and Shannon Architects, the glass and champagne curtain wall makes for an eye-catching exterior. Inside the apartments combine downtown loft-style living with Park Avenue chic and have access to a full range of five-star amenities.

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350 West Broadway, New York, NY

  • Available from $11,500,000 – $11,500,000

40 Mercer

40 Mercer is a modern, 13-story tower in SoHo developed by hotelier Andre Balaz and designed by Pritzker Prize-winning French architect Jean Nouvel. 40 Mercer is noted for its cutting-edge use of glass walls, as Nouvel used 7’ x 12’ sheets of glass – the largest ever used in a residential project.

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40 Mercer Street, New York, NY

  • Available from $825,000 – $50,000,000

Trump Soho

Trump SoHo is an impressive 46-story silver-glass building located on Spring Street in the heart of fashionable SoHo that has 391 hotel condominium studios, suites, and penthouses with unrivaled views of the city, Hudson River, Statue of Liberty, and Empire State Building.

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246 Spring Street, New York, NY

  • Available from $1,695,000 – $1,695,000

One Kenmare Square

One Kenmare Square façade is composed of alternating horizontal bands of brick & glass on an undulating curve that shifts at every floor. The banded brick is reminiscent of the old warehouse buildings that are part of this part of the city. The brick on the front façades is a textured iridescent gray. At different times of day, the brick will appear to change color, from a silvery sheen to purple gray, to black. The rough ’artisan’ texture is intended to animate the façade. The continuous aluminum windows are eight feet high. The windows on the street façades are triple-glazed with laminated glass to provide an acoustic separation from the street. A vertical notch in the building’s north and south faces splits the building in two. While the front half of the building is rendered in the gray brick described above, the volume of building facing the rear courtyard is rendered in a silvery red brick with a smooth velour finish. The rear/West façade of the Lafayette St. building is composed of a seemingly random mix of punched openings. The pattern however is the result of a formula in which every living room has at least 3 windows and every bedroom has at least two windows.” The entrance to on One Kenmare Square is flanked on either side by piers that are wrapped in textured gray ’Pompeii’ lava stone. A canopy clad in anodized aluminum runs the length of the lobby and through the door. The lobby walls and floor are clad in the textured gray ’Pompeii’ stone, cut in long, thin planks. The same stone comes in from the outside to the inside of the lobby on the floor and the walls. In the center of this linear space two volumes are shaped from the same material. One is a long and low volume that can function as a bench and the other a tall and wider volume that conceals the mailboxes behind. A twelve-foot-high wave of pale blue resin runs along the length of the north wall – mimicking the same curve at the front façade.” One Kenmare Square has 53 residences assited by a 24-hour doorman/concierge and video surveillance. It will also have storage lockers in the cellar and a fitness center. The kitchens at One Kenmare Square offers Miele, Thermador, Bosch and Sub Zero appliances with stainless steel finishes and white carrera marble countertops with gray veins. Kitchen cabinets are finished in gray lacquer. All apartments have Bosch washer/dryers. On floors 2 to 8, ceilings of the main spaces of apartments are 10-feet-three-inches high. On floors 9 and 10, ceilings of the main spaces at 10-feet-high. In the penthouse apartments on the 11th floor, the ceilings are 12-feet-high.

210 Lafayette Street, New York, NY

  • Available from $3,125,000 – $4,900,000

Soho Mews

SoHo Mews, designed by Gwathmey Siegal, is one of the few new developments in SoHo.  Comprised of two residential buildings with a private landscaped courtyard connecting the two, SoHo Mews buildings front both West Broadway, across from SoHo Grand Hotel, and classic Wooster St.

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311 West Broadway, New York, NY

  • Available from $15,999,999 – $30,000,000

The Candle Building

11 Spring Street presents itself as a one-of-a-kind opportunity to create unique living environments in this amazing NoLita neighborhood. Once known as the proud The Candle Building, celebrated as a canvas of street artists, 11 Spring is being reborn by Architect Edward Asfour as a discrete, 3 owner hideaway amidst all that is accessible from this quiet locale.

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11 Spring Street, New York, NY

  • Available from $2,625,000 – $3,750,000

Urban Glass House

Located at 330 Spring Street and the corner of Washington Street, the Urban Glass House is the last building in New York City designed by architect Philip Johnson who passed away in 2005, with his firm Philip Johnson/Alan Ritchie Architects. Indeed the project seemed to be burdened by constant challenges over the course of its design and construction.

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330 Spring Street, New York, NY